This Is What Human Flourishing Looks Like

This Is What Human Flourishing Looks Like

How do we do it? How does Ourganda turn misery zones into human flourishing zones?
• We hired ten of the most committed, kindhearted medical professionals in Uganda.
• We bought two 4-wheel-drive vehicles and
equipped them as mobile medical clinics.
• Our teams adopted six desperate, forgotten
villages where everyone struggles to survive,
and unnecessary death is common.
• The teams set up a rhythm to visit every
village once a week with the goal of
transforming these villages into human
flourishing zones.
How is it going?
Fantastic. Without Ourganda, the six misery zones would be the same or worse than before our teams
adopted them. Instead, unnecessary death is unheard of. People are healthy. The villages are changing
dramatically.
But that’s not all. Ourganda is not just helping
with physiological needs like water, nutrition,
good health habits, and medications. Our
teams are moving them up Ourganda’s pyramid
and helping them experience spiritual health,
love and belonging, financial security, and to
reach their potential (thanks to Maslow for his
inspiration!).
Who is leading the way?
Vincent is way ahead of the curve. Not only does
he oversee Ourganda’s entire program, not only
does he put in a full week of medical treatment
with the teams in the villages, but check out what
else he is doing in the village of Sarakihombya
(in his spare time):
This Is What Human Flourishing Looks LikeOne Time Projects Total Cost Raised Needed
Project CURE $35,000 $2,500 $32,500
Community Center (fence) $24,478 $4,117 $20,361
Water Project $17,141 $6,840 $10,301
Ongoing Projects Cost Needed
Kits (Kids) $12 each hundreds
Kits (Hygiene, Birthing) $8 each hundreds
Water Filters $40 each hundreds
Urgent Medical Surgeries $1,000 average per person
Ron Gladden
Ourganda Director
• Vincent has set up a micro-lending pool to finance
business startups in the village like beekeeping and
raising goats and chickens.
• He teaches a class for men on how to be loving and
supportive husbands, including helping their wives
carry some of the load in the household.
• His wife, Esther,
teaches women
how to create
income for their
families by
making baskets
and other crafts.
• His daughter,
Sharon, teaches
women and
girls to make
reusable pads
for women in Ourganda’s villages. We are delighted to
purchase them from these entrepreneurs in our own
villages instead of buying the pads from a commercial
business.
• He and others are teaching nutrition, tailoring, crafts,
hair dressing, and carpentry. Thank you!
Two and a half years ago, Sarakihombya was the
saddest of places. The women retrieved water for their
families from a disgusting, polluted pond. The villagers
worked hard to survive. The only access to the village
was a narrow, dirt footpath. Today, Sarakihombya is
moving up the pyramid. People feel proud of their
village. More and more men are healthy and happy.
The women feel safe, valued, and connected. Children
receive health kits and they learn how to help their
families with the goats or the chickens. Every week,
the Ourganda van rolls into the village and unloads a
team of smiling people who share a devotional, teach
a health class, treat injuries and illnesses, and prove
to the villagers that someone loves them and cares
about them.
What is the vision?
Our teams will keep doing what they are doing in
more and more places. Building on what Vincent has
started in Sarakihombya and what others on the team
are doing in five other places, the Ourganda board
set this goal: By the end of this decade, Ourganda will
transform at least 12 villages into human flourishing
zones.
How would you like to help?
Please send the most generous donation you can,
and let us know if you want us to spend it where it
is needed most – or for water systems, hygiene kits,
birthing kits, kids kits, sickle cell testing, or something
else.
Every penny will help.

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